Miscellaneous

When an Exempt Organization Must Report Changes to the IRS

An exempt organization must report name, address and structural and operational changes to the IRS. If an organization files an annual return (such as a form 990 or 990-EZ), it must report the changes on its return.  If the organization needs to report a change of name, see Change of Name- Exempt Organizations.  If it needs to report a change of address, see Change of Address – Exempt Organizations. The EO Determinations Office can issue an affirmation letter showing an organization’s new name and/or address and affirming the section of the Internal Revenue Code under which IRS records show the organization as tax-exempt and whether contributions to the organization are deductible.

An organization may request a determination letter regarding the effect of certain changes on its public charity status or private foundation status.   For example, a determination letter will be issued to reclassify an organization as a public charity or a private foundation.  An organization may also request a determination letter showing whether it is exempt from filing annual information returns in certain situations.

If an organization is unsure about whether a proposed change in its purposes or activities is consistent with its status as an exempt organization or as a public charity, it may want to request a private letter ruling. However, the IRS will not make any determination regarding any completed transaction.

 

2018-05-13T12:21:23+00:00 June 18th, 2014|Legal Issues, Miscellaneous|0 Comments

Exempt Organizations Select Check

Exempt Organizations Select Check is an on-line search tool that allows users to search for and select an exempt organization and check certain information about its federal tax status and filings.  It consolidates three former search sites into one, providing expanded search capability and a more efficient way to search for organizations that:

  • Are eligible to receive tax-deductible charitable contributions (Publication 78 data). Users may rely on this list in determining deductibility of their contributions (just as they did when Publication 78 was a separate electronic publication rather than part of Select Check).
  • Have had their tax-exempt status automatically revoked under the law because they have not filed Form 990 series returns or notices annually as required for three consecutive years (Auto-Revocation List)
  • Have filed a Form 990-N (e-Postcard) annual electronic notice. (Most small exempt organizations whose annual gross receipts are normally $50,000 or less are required to electronically submit Form 990-N, unless they choose instead to file a completed Form 990 or Form 990-EZ.)

In addition to searching for a particular organization, users may download a complete list of each of the three types of organizations through Exempt Organizations Select Check.

Search Tips for Exempt Organizations Select Check

FOR RELATED INFORMATION SEE:

2018-05-13T12:21:22+00:00 March 20th, 2014|IRS News, Miscellaneous|0 Comments

Beware of Impersonation of Charitable Organizations Scams

Another long-standing type of abuse or fraud is scams that occur in the wake of significant natural disasters.

Following major disasters, it’s common for scam artists to impersonate charities to get money or private information from well-intentioned taxpayers. Scam artists can use a variety of tactics. Some scammers operating bogus charities may contact people by telephone or email to solicit money or financial information. They may even directly contact disaster victims and claim to be working for or on behalf of the IRS to help the victims file casualty loss claims and get tax refunds.

They may attempt to get personal financial information or Social Security numbers that can be used to steal the victims’ identities or financial resources. Bogus websites may solicit funds for disaster victims. The IRS cautions both victims of natural disasters and people wishing to make charitable donations to avoid scam artists by following these tips:

  • To help disaster victims, donate to recognized charities.
  • Be wary of charities with names that are similar to familiar or nationally known organizations. Some phony charities use names or websites that sound or look like those of respected, legitimate organizations. IRS.gov has a search feature, Exempt Organizations Select Check, which allows people to find legitimate, qualified charities to which donations may be tax-deductible.
  • Don’t give out personal financial information, such as Social Security numbers or credit card and bank account numbers and passwords, to anyone who solicits a contribution from you. Scam artists may use this information to steal your identity and money.
  • Don’t give or send cash. For security and tax record purposes, contribute by check or credit card or another way that provides documentation of the gift.

Call the IRS toll-free disaster assistance telephone number (866-562-5227) if you are a disaster victim with specific questions about tax relief or disaster related tax issues.

2018-01-14T10:38:14+00:00 March 4th, 2014|IRS News, Miscellaneous|0 Comments

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