2010 Federal Tax Brackets & Tables Announced

CCH, a national distributor of tax information, published the 2010 federal tax brackets and tables that adjustments for projected inflation (based on inflation data released by the U.S. Department of Labor).  Here are some common adjustments:

  • Standard Deduction:  No change — $5,700 single/$11,400 joint (as in 2009)
  • Personal Exemption:  No change — $3,650 (as in 2009)
  • Gift Tax Exemption:   No change — $13,000 (as in 2009)
  • Kiddie Tax Threshold:  No change — $950 (as in 2009)
  • Income Limit for Full Roth IRA Contributions:  $105,000 single/$167,000 joint (no change/up $1,000 from 2009)

Here are the projected 2010 tax tables (along with the actual 2009 tax tables):

Single Filers

2010 Taxable Income Rate 2009 Taxable Income Rate
$0 – $8,375 10% $0 – $8,350 10%
$8,375 – $34,000 15% $8,350 – $33,950 15%
$34,000 – $82,400 25% $33,950 – $82,250 25%
$82,400 – $171,850 28% $82,250 – $171,550 28%
$171,850 – $373,650 33% $171,550 – $372,950 33%
$373,650 + 35% $372,950 + 35%

Married Filing Jointly (& Surviving Spouse)

2010 Taxable Income Rate 2009 Taxable Income Rate
$0 – $16,750 10% $0 – $16,700 10%
$16,750 – $68,000 15% $16,700 – $67,900 15%
$68,000 – $137,300 25% $67,900 – $137,050 25%
$137,300 – $209,250 28% $137,050 – $208,850 28%
$209,250 – $373,650 33% $208,850 – $372,950 33%
$373,650 + 35% $372,950 + 35%
2017-06-02T21:14:32+00:00

One Comment

  1. Stacy January 5, 2010 at 2:17 pm

    If a married couple had a taxable income of 68,000 exactly, then they would be taxed 9,362.50 That is 16,750 @ 10% and 51,250 @ 15%. Any earnings greater than 68,000 will be taxed at 25% until it reaches the upper limit of that bracket.

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